GA Trade May-Jun interactive - page 30

D
espite its rich cultural diversity,
one thing is clearlynoticeable
when traveling toWisconsin: The
state has an exceptionally strong
Germanheritage (42.6%, followed by
10,9% Irish, and 9,3%Polish), which is
vibrant to this day. Apart frommany
German cultural institutions, the state
maintains a sister-state relationship
with theGermanState of Hesse. The
capitalMadison, has been the sister
city of Freiburg imBreisgau since
1986, while the state’s largest city,
Milwaukee, is a sister city of Schwerin.
German business flourishes in this
Midwestern state, with approximately
10,700Wisconsinites employed by 81
German companies, actively sup-
ported byGACCMidwest’sWisconsin
Chapter.Wisconsin’smajor industries
include advancedmanufacturing and
machinery, agriculture, and health
care, with the area of industrial
activity centered around theMilwau-
keemetropolitan area. The state’s
manufacturing sector accounts for
roughly 20% of the state's gross
domestic product, a proportion that is
third among all U.S. states.
Investing in the Future –
R&Dand Education
Wisconsin also encourages entrepre-
neurship and development in technol-
ogy. The state invests in public-private
partnerships (PPPs) so as to support
start ups and to enableWisconsin
businesses to bridge the gap between
technological innovation and industry
applications. One of these PPPs is the
cooperation betweenGlendale-based
JohnsonControls and theGerman
Fraunhofer’s Institute for Environ-
mental, Safety and
Energy Technology
andwith its
Institute for
Manufacturing
Technology and
AdvancedMaterials to
developmore energy
efficient and cost effective
cooling systems for vehicle
batteries.
1
Furthermore, the University of
Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madi-
son) is categorized as anRU/VH
ResearchUniversity (very high
research activity) in the Carnegie
Classification of Institutions of Higher
Education.
2
In 2010, it had research
expenditures ofmore than 1 billion
dollars.
3
In 2008, the University's
R&D expenditureswere ranked the
third highest in the nation.
4
The
UW-Madison is an internationally
recognized leader in stem cell
research. In 1998, the first isolation
and culture of human embryonic stem
cellswas reported. UW-Madison has
remained on the forefront of stem cell
research ever since and in order to
strengthen and sustain its leadership,
in 2007 established the renowned
StemCell andRegenerativeMedicine
Center (SCRMC).
Putting such a strong emphasis on a
highly-skilled, productiveworkforce
is another explanation for the
strength and attractiveness of
Wisconsin. The state’s commitment to
quality education is visible in its
strong educational system, ranging
from public schools over the nation’s
first Technical College System to a
statewide university system. This
strength in training and innovation
allowed the state’s unemployment
rate to drop to 6.1 percent, its lowest
point sinceNovember 2008.
5
Wisconsin does an excellent job in
paring their plentiful natural resourc-
eswith a dynamic climate for
innovation. Based on the state’s
Wisconsin
–Moving Forward
S T A T E S P E C I A L
by JasminWelter, GACC
WISCONSIN
Population:
5,726,398
State Capital:
Madison
Size:
65,497 sqmi
GlobalWaterCenter,Milwaukee
30
GermanAmerican TradeMay/June 2014
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