Trade Sep-Oct Interactive - page 34

W
e are in Indiana, the Cross-
roads of America. Indiana is
a classic Midwestern state: It features
a diversified industry landscape with
a focus on manufacturing and
machinery, as well as a robust
automotive industry, where suppliers
are located close to U.S. automakers,
the Japanese plants throughout Ohio
and Indiana, as well as the German
OEMs of the “German triangle."
Through a combination of its diverse
assets, the state continues to grow
and flourish, which does not go
unnoticed in the international invest-
ment community.
From South Bend in the north
through Indianapolis – the capital
located in the heart of the state – to
Evansville in the south, every corner
of the state seems to have profited
from the general upward trend in
foreign direct investment flowing
into the US. True to its state slogan,
“Restart Your Engines,” Indiana is
redefining itself and keeps develop-
ing dynamically.
Even though they might be an innate
part of the state’s identity, Indiana is
more than the Indy 500 – ‘The
Greatest Spectacle in Racing’ – and
successful college sports. The land of
basketball and auto racing has
channeled its competitive nature into
business. This is particularly true for
the state’s strong medical
industry, with the world’s
leading cluster for orthope-
dics. Through the Warsaw
Cluster, one county alone
generates nearly one-third
of the world’s orthopedic
sales volume, making it one
of the most concentrated
centers of economic activity in
the United States.
1
With business-friendly legislation in
place, the Hoosier State is one of the
most sought after places for business
in the country. One of the most
important manufacturing regions,
Indiana continues to attract manu-
facturing companies, which find the
infrastructure, resources, and skilled
workforce they need for growing
their business in the state. A recent
publication by the Bureau of
Economic Analysis for 2012
found Indiana at the top of the
nation when it comes to the percent-
age of state GDP derived from
manufacturing.
2
With a special focus on economic
development initiatives, the Hoosier
State could establish itself as a
low-cost place for companies to
invest and conduct business – and
eventually add jobs. German
subsidiaries alone are responsible for
the creation of 12,500 jobs within
the Indiana economy, amongst them
Robert Bosch, Freudenberg & Co.,
Siemens, ThyssenKrupp, and Zentis,
all of which have had production
sites in Indiana for years.
Indiana
S T A T E S P E C I A L
German American Trade Sep/Oct 2013
34
INDIANA
Capital:
Indianapolis
Population:
6,537,334
Size:
36,418 sq mi
by Jasmin Welter, GACC
2. Bureau of Economic Analysis for 2012
The Children's Museum of Indianapolis
1...,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33 35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,...48
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