Trade Sep-Oct Interactive - page 20

S P O T L I G H T S
introduction did not equal European
integration.
Following the academic perspective,
Valerie Rouxel-Laxton presented a
political viewpoint and concluded
that the “lifestyle super power”
Europe must show the added value
for all its citizens. She added “It
takes reform, partnership, and
cooperation to create a prosperous
European future.” She also empha-
sized the dangers of youth unem-
ployment, but pointed to the
opportunities the 28-member states
labor market offers: “We have to
prepare people to be mobile.”
Regarding the economic relations
between the US, Europe, and Asia,
she stated that European invest-
ments in the US are twice as high as
in India and China, and US invest-
ments in Europe are three times as
high as in all of Asia combined. This
fact should encourage educators to
keep Europe on their minds – and
include conversations about
transatlantic relations in the
classroom.
To emphasize the importance of this
topic, there is no better example
than the ongoing negotiations about
the Transatlantic Trade and Invest-
ment Partnership (TTIP). Retired
ambassador JD Bindenagel stressed
that after nearly two decades of
attempts to negotiate a Transatlantic
Free Trade Agreement, there has
never before been such an ambitious
bilateral negotiation as TTIP. He
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
Among the most significant
benefits of the agreement is
combining the two largest
economies in the world among
partners who share common
values in the rule of law.
JD Bindenagel
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